Anonymous asked: To touch on the theatre question for the other anon, I would like to say that I am quite tired of older adventists "praying" for me when they find out that I am a theatre major in college.I understand that they believe they are doing the right thing & I, of course, will take all the prayers I can get but I truely believe that my gift of theatre & acting was given to me by God, just like if someone else has a gift for math. I am not a bad person in God's eyes because I do costumes & act & direct.

This is the continuation of a conversation started with this ask about Adventists and movie theaters. If you have anything to contribute, send in an ask!

Hello Anon,

That is rough times indeed. I know lots of people who minister through drama and theater; in fact, I am frequently in drama ministry myself. An Adventist man named DeVon Franklin came to speak at AU and he is involved in making movies in Hollywood (Check out his book called Produced by Faith). I think that God gives people different gifts including the ability to reach other people through drama. People will down you for it (trust me, it’s still a problem in our church), but as long as you know God ordained you to do this, lean on Him. Keep praying and striving to bring glory to Him.

~Yvonne

primashakespearia-deactivated20 asked: Christian Greetings! =) so is there any difference between watching movies in a cinema, and watching movies at home? or is it all about choosing "good movies"?

This is the continuation of a conversation started with this ask about Adventists and movie theaters. If you have anything to contribute, send in an ask!

Christian greetings! (I like that. I may use that more…)

I just did a bit of research on movie-going and what it does to the brain, because I’ve heard a few things here and there about watching movies in the theater has a certain effect on your brain. Apparently, there is some truth to that. There has been a study on how watching movies affect the frontal cortex, which has been referenced on a neuroscience blog called The Frontal Cortex (now located here but used to be on here) by Jonah Lehrer. In two of his posts (“Avatar" and "Watching Movies”), he says, basically, that when you watch a movie in a movie theater, you are immersed in it. To quote him directly, “At its core, movies are about dissolution: we forget about ourselves and become one with the giant projected characters on the screen. In other words, they become our temporary avatars, so that we’re inseparable from their story.” We probably didn’t need a study to confirm this, you know, with surround sound, a pitch black room, and another world about 50 feet tall taking up your entire vision. What makes this so different from watching it at home? Well, to quote another article, this time from Psychology Today called “Who Says Film is Dead?" by Norman N. Holland, Ph.D:

If they had been watching VHS or DVDs or Netflix streaming at home that wouldn’t have happened—or it wouldn’t have happened to the same degree. The audience would be in control, free to stop the DVD or streaming, put down the iPad for a moment, switch to another channel—whatever. They would be maintaining the possibility of action. Their motor systems would still have been engaged, and the “suspension of disbelief” or “poetic faith" that should be part of our movie experience wouldn’t have happened or wouldn’t have happened to the extent it should.

From what I can see, other than the choice of movie and such, that is the main difference. Not to say immersion is bad a good story is the kind that can capture your attention but be wary of what you’re getting immersed into.

Hope that helps!

~Yvonne

Submitted by tetisiwachronicles

Submitted by tetisiwachronicles

Anonymous asked: I'm Seventh-Day Adventist and I go to the movies all the time....I don't really see a problem with it as long as you're not going to see movies that aren't honouring God.

This is a continuation of a conversation that started with this ask about Adventists and the movies. If you have any thoughts you’d like to throw in, send it here!

~Yvonne

Anonymous asked: Why are SDA's so against going to the movies? Did Ellen G White say something about that because it's obviously not in the bible. What's the position and why?

Hello Anon,

Ellen G. White lived before the time of movies, as we know, but she did live in the time of theaters. She has commented on theaters in several of her writings, but I think that the one that sums up her complete views on it is found in Adventist Home:

Among the most dangerous resorts for pleasure is the theater. Instead of being a school for morality and virtue, as is so often claimed, it is the very hotbed of immorality. Vicious habits and sinful propensities are strengthened and confirmed by these entertainments. Low songs, lewd gestures, expressions, and attitudes deprave the imagination and debase the morals. Every youth who habitually attends such exhibitions will be corrupted in principle. There is no influence in our land more powerful to poison the imagination, to destroy religious impressions, and to blunt the relish for the tranquil pleasures and sober realities of life than theatrical amusements. The love for these scenes increases with every indulgence as the desire for intoxicating drink strengthens with its use. The only safe course is to shun the theater, the circus, and every other questionable place of amusement. {AH 516.2}

Her analysis of the theater in her time and age is quite right. From the 18th to the mid-19th century, American theater was quite unwholesome. The popular performances of the time were minstrel shows and Victorian burlesque performances. Even later into the century, stuff such as vaudeville became popular. Another form of theater in the late 19th century were cabarets, which were held in nightclubs that doubled as brothels (think Moulin Rogue). As said by Jesse Bond, an English singer and actress of the late 19th century, ”The stage was at a low ebb, Elizabethan glories and Georgian artificialities had alike faded into the past, stilted tragedy and vulgar farce were all the would-be playgoer had to choose from, and the theatre had become a place of evil repute.” These popular shows glorified sex, racism, and all kinds of vulgarity that shouldn’t be pleasing to Christians at all.

Even though that kind of theater has fallen out of favor, the same manner of thinking has carried over to how some Adventists view movie theaters. Keep in mind that not all Adventists feel this way, but apparently it’s prevalent enough to be an overarching idea or else you wouldn’t be writing me about it. Things are not the same as Ellen G. White’s time, but her words are still something to pay attention to. Of course, movie theaters nowadays don’t double as brothels, but what is the entertainment industry really glorifying? Movies such as the American Pie series, Friends with Benefits, and The Hangover Part II, what message are they portraying? In the theater or out, we should keep in mind that it’s what we are choosing to fill our minds with. In this way, EGW’s writings fall with Paul’s when he says “Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things” (Philippians 4:8)

Hope this helps!,

~Yvonne

Sources:
https://egwwritings.org/ Search:Theater
http://content.lib.washington.edu/19thcenturyactorsweb/essay.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theater_of_the_United_States#The_19th_century
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jessie_Bond
http://math.boisestate.edu/gas/books/bond/intro.html